The Humans by Matt Haig

Image result for the humans by matt haigI listened to the audiobook: The Humans by Matt Haig. This is the story of an alien who comes to earth and assumes the likeness of a mathematics professor in order to prevent that professor from a mathematical discovery which may have catastrophic impact on the universe. At first, the alien is repulsed by humanity and does not understand the meaning behind even the most basic human interactions. However, as his mission extends, he is drawn into the emotional depth of human interactions. He starts to appreciate music and poetry and develop deeper relationships with the family of the man he’s disguised as.

This book was extremely amusing at times and at other times, extremely poignant. It was really interesting to hear perceptions of humanity from an (albeit fictitious) alien perspective. A lively and entertaining read, I would highly recommend The Humans. (Submitted by Seline)

Borrow now from Surrey Libraries!

 

The Forgetting Time by Sharon Guskin

Image result for the forgetting time by sharon guskin

Wonderful characters and a unique crisis make this novel an enticing read, but solid writing and a great plot will keep you reading to the end. Single mom, Janie, struggles to keep herself together and protect her four year-old son, Noah, as his bizarre behaviour destroys their lives. Noah panics when Janie tries to wash him, constantly shares information that he can’t possibly know, and begs to be returned to his real home and mom. In desperation Janie contacts Dr. Jerome Anderson, whose life and career is ending tragically, creating an alliance that offers hope and resolution for them all. Supernatural elements are intelligently explored and rooted in research so the mystery is solid and believable. I strongly recommend this captivating story (Submitted by Pippa).

Borrow now from Surrey Libraries!

The Brightest Sun by Adrienne Benson

Image result for the brightest sun by adrienne benson

In Benson’s debut novel, we are swept away to the world of Africa, where European settlers in the big cities live alongside traditional villages with its inhabitants and culture. Throughout the stories in this book, the thread that ties it all together is the theme of motherhood.

We meet Leona, a woman traveling from the United States to study and live among the villagers. After accidentally getting pregnant and giving birth to her daughter Adia, Leona decides to hand off raising the child to Simi, the only villager who can speak English and who yearns for a child of her own but cannot have.

Meanwhile, Jane, another Westerner, has arrived to photograph the horrors of elephant poaching. She winds up falling in love with a fellow ex-pat and the two have a daughter of their own: Grace.

Eventually, the stories of Leona, Simi, Jane, and Grace all intertwine like the gnarled roots of an African tree rising high from the desert ground. This is an epic tale of mothers and daughters, friendship, culture and colonization, family secrets, and the need to belong, all set against the backdrop of the blazing African sun (Submitted by Alan).

Borrow now from Surrey Libraries!

The Memory Box by Eva Lesko Natiello

Image result for the memory box

Caroline cannot remember anything from her past life, but she doesn’t know that there is an incredible gap in her memory. A coincidental Google search lead her to discover that and it turns her life upside down. Her mission to uncover the truth about her past begins.

The Memory Box is a fascinating, well crafted psychological thriller that’s full of twists and turns. Her college Alumni, her doctor, the newspaper, all have info about her past but she is clueless.

It kept me wondering what really happened in her past life? Is she a victim or an instigator? Why was she so keen to uncover her past, and what was that destructive pull that led her to keep looking into her past at all costs? Find out by reading this gripping, ‘unputdownable’ novel. (Submitted by Jamila)

Borrow Now From Surrey Libraries!

Wrecked by Joe Ide

Image result for wrecked by joe ide

This is the 3rd book in the IQ mystery series and it holds together really well. Like the first two books, I have to get over some of the violence and language used, but I keep coming back. I still find Isaiah Quintabe, IQ, a believable and relatable character, and the world he moves in, his ‘hood’, is filled with gangs and grandmothers, those that are homeless and those that are damaged, families and individuals, all trying to either get by or fight their way through life.

The author grew up in the same part of the Los Angeles as the book’s setting and his description of streets and houses and strip malls bring you right there. Now I just have to be patient for book number four to come out. (Submitted by Renee)

Borrow now from Surrey Libraries!

The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss

Image result for the name of the wind

Winner of the Quill and Alex Awards in 2007, the Name of the Wind is an epic fantasy and the first book in The Kingkiller Chronicle series. Told as a story within a story, the tale of the mythic hero Kvothe’s rise is equal parts exciting, romantic and heart wrenching. Author Patrick Rothfuss’ prose captures Kvothe’s journey from small child to notorious legend in grand vivid style. A thoroughly enjoyable read for fantasy fans.  (Submitted by Arvind)

Borrow now from Surrey Libraries!

 

 

Woman is No Man by Etaf Rum

Image result for a woman is no man

In Etaf Rum’s debut novel, A Woman is No Man, we are introduced to three generations of Palestinian-American women who are all tied down to tradition and culture. Isra is the girl from Palestine who gets married off to an American and shuttled away to Brooklyn, New York. There, she battles her dreams of a better life in America, one where women are valued and not subservient to their husbands. But her new mother-in-law Fareeda is just as traditional as her own mother, pressuring her to have a son and disregarding the daughters that Isra eventually bears, including the first born, Deya. But perhaps it is Deya who will finally manage to find that balance between being Arab and American and breaks free from the tight constraints of a patriarchal mindset, through the use of books and the discovery of secrets long kept hidden…

This was an enthralling read that had me hooked from the very first chapter. Etaf Rum seamlessly invites us into a world we may or may not be familiar with. This world will horrify you and sadden you, but ultimately it will provide you with hope that a better world may be on its way. Jumping between timelines and characters, Woman is No Man depicts the voices of women who have been silenced for far too long. (Submitted by Alan)

Borrow now from Surrey Libraries!