The Deepest Well by Nadine Burke Harris

deepest wellThere are many facets to stories of childhood trauma, and many layers. As we see in Nadine Burke Harris book, The Deepest Well: Healing the Long-Term Effects of Childhood Adversity, trauma is no stranger to anyone: if we haven’t experienced ourselves, we know a loved one who has had experience with or witnessed it. When I read this book, I could not help but think of the children who are now separated from their parents at the borders and of children fleeing Syria. There are many places where trauma is a fact of life, and the inner city can be one of them.  WHO recognizes that social conditions are important factors in health, and the all contribute to our total health. Nadine Burke Harris’ in The Deepest Well, gives a gripping account of her exploration of the link between adverse childhood experience or (ACE) and toxic stress. She is a social innovator in public health and serves a vibrant community, in San Francisco’s Bayview Hunters Point (BHP). She describes the challenges she faced personally and professionally when she opened the Center for Youth Wellness (CYW) as well as her attempts to have ACE and toxic stress, recognized as serious issue in children’s health, which included getting pediatricians to use screening protocols for ACE in pediatric assessments.

Burke Harris, a pediatrician with a Master’s in Public Health, writes with compassion and balance about connecting the stress of her patients with their emotional and physical well-being. When offering free pediatric care to children via her clinic, CYW, in BHP, an area that is on the extreme end of San Francisco’s social and economic inequality, Burke Harris saw clear relationships between the trauma that the community’s children experienced and their emotional and physical health. Toxic stress can, and often does, manifest itself in disease and poor health. Her examination discusses how poverty in the inner city can result in greater incidence of poor health with difficult living conditions, more exposure to violence, and untreated mental illness. While San Francisco’s median income was above $100,000 in 2016, City-Data shows that 31% of residents of Bayview Hunters Point live below the poverty line as of the last U.S. Census.

Poverty contributes to trauma, but Burke Harris reminds her audiences that trauma crosses all socio-economic boundaries. She tells us not only the stories of the children that she treated, and still treats, at the BHP Center, but also about her personal journey of trauma. Trauma does not stop in the wealthier neighborhoods. Helping overcome childhood trauma depends on your caregiver. There are engaged and nurturing caregivers in every community, just as there are neglectful caregivers in any community; however, if you live in inner city poverty, your chance of seeing violence randomly outside the home is likely. In one of Burke Harris’ case studies, a teenage boy, recovering well from childhood abuse, sees his best friend is killed on the street in front of him. Understandably, this incident is a setback for his health. The children Burke-Harris treated suffer from multiple adverse reactions, and have debilitating physical and psychological challenges ranging from asthma, obesity, failure to thrive, to stunted growth.

Although Burke-Harris’ accounts of traumatic experience can be shattering, such as the boy who stopped growing at age four when he trauma is exclusive to inner city poverty.  Burke Harris reminds her audience repeatedly that toxic stress is an issue in any income bracket. Bringing this to a wider audience, Burke Harris shows us that society suffers when it ignores childhood trauma.

Thankfully, something can be done to help children (and adults) suffering from toxic stress. In fact, according to Burke Harris, part of the antidote to toxic stress is truly integrated health treatment including a combination of healthy relationships, counselling, meditation, exercise, and nutrition. The  caregiver and their response to trauma play a huge role, but, sadly for those in underserved areas, so do  the resources available to the child.

Though the subject matter is tough, the book and its author are inspiring, positive and passionate. This title comes as a hardcopy, eBook and is also available as an audiobook narrated by the author, which I highly recommend.

Watch Dr. Nadine Burke Harris here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=95ovIJ3dsNk or find her book at your local library in audio, eBook or hardcopy: Burke Harris, Nadine. (2018) The deepest well: Dealing with the long-term effects of childhood adversity. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

(Submitted by J.Wile)

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50 Canadians Who Changed the World by Kenneth McGoogan

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If you’d like to explore Canada and Canadians who made a huge difference in our country and world-wide, then, look no further than Kenneth McGoogan’s 50 Canadians Who Changed the World. Very informative, well written, nicely balanced (there is just enough information and you feel completely satisfied – you don’t get bored and you don’t become overloaded with facts). Borrow now and brush up on your famous Canadians knowledge just in time for Canada Day 2018. There is plenty of time still! (Submitted by Mariya)

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Dear Fahrenheit 451: Book Love and Heartbreak in the Stacks : A Librarian’s Love Letters and Breakup Notes to the Books in Her Life by Annie Spence

dear-fahrenheit451Loving books should never been seen as a competition; but, if it was, Annie Spence would win gold. This book is made up of two great parts: letters to her favourite (or not so favourite) books, and book lists that include a wide range of topics and familiar titles from part one thrown in the mix, like any awesome librarian would do if they wrote a book about books. It’s a short read (like The Book of Awesome), but deeply engrossing. Each letter feels like a mini book club, with Spence’s heart and humour leading the discussion. As someone who works in a library, this almost seems like the easiest book to write a review on. It has many of my favourite things: books, library stories, humour. But as an avid reader, I feel like I’ve met a new friend, who gives pretty awesome recommendations for what to read next! Give this book a try, even if you aren’t sure about reading a book about books. (Submitted by Mara)

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50 Children: One Ordinary American Couple’s Extraordinary Rescue Mission Into the Heart of Nazi Germany by Steven Pressman

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This is a true story about a very small group of people who decided to rescue 50 Jewish children from Nazi Germany in 1939-legally. The idea came from someone who was the head of a Jewish fraternal society in Philadelphia. He proposed that this society could rescue 50 children from Nazi occupied Germany and escort them to the USA where they could be fostered (both physically and financially) by other Jewish families until the rest of the children’s family could immigrate to the USA.  This size of group, coming from Germany, all children, had never been done before. The enormity of this quest was not fully realized as political (both German and American), religious, and emotional barriers all had to be overcome. Gilbert and Eleanor Kraus were the people to head up the American Calvary to rescue 50 children, and in doing so, potentially rescue 50 German families as well.  Constant worries about visas, health concerns, language differences, as well as taking these children from living parents and other siblings, weighed heavily on the Kraus couple’s mind. This book reads like a suspense novel where time is ticking away and you never know when things are going to change.  Take a read and find out if there was a happy ending! (Submitted by Jamie)

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Bad Ideas by Michael V. Smith

bad-ideas-michaelsmith

Poetry can seem intimidating, especially if you were scarred by it in english class in high school. But Michael V. Smith’s latest collection of poems, Bad Ideas is very accessible and richly rewarding: reading his poems feels like watching a beautiful rainbow, his words wash over you in waves of colourful emotions – joy, sadness, grief, and humour. His poetry is not weighed down by oblique references or excess verbiage: he speaks plainly and from his personal experience dealing with family trauma, lost loved ones and long-distance friends. Bad Ideas is a great introduction to poetry in the 21st century.  (Submitted by Andrea)

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Anyone Can Papercraft: A Step-by-step Guide to Essential Paper Skills by Elizabeth Moad

anyone can papercraftIf you have kids around or just want to have crafting fun all to yourself, give Anyone can Papercraft book a try. I have a feeling you might like it. It’s one of those Do-it-Yourself books that are actually practical. By practical I mean that you will be able to make all sorts of neat things and without a need to go out purchasing some crazy (and, often expensive) tools that you might never use again. The projects in this book are for all comfort levels and the majority of them don’t require any previous crafting experience or any specialized tools. The designs and ideas are quite simple, but there is always an elegant touch to them – it’s hard to pick which project to do because there are so many great options! (Submitted by Mariya)

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Surrey: A City of Stories by K. Jane Watt

surrey-city-of-stories

Surrey:  A City of Stories is a Canada 150 legacy project produced by Heritage Services (City of Surrey).  Author, Jane Watt, recounts Surrey’s history from ancient times to the present, using photographs of artifacts, maps, historical photographs and documents.  Watt also includes transcriptions from oral histories. The extensive use of visuals to accompany text is very successful.  The past is brought to life vividly and clearly.  Most importantly, Watt demonstrates how Surrey residents of all backgrounds, collectively and individually, shaped our city in the past and in the present. (Submitted by Carolyn C.)

Borrow this book from Surrey Libraries! 

Would you like to meet the author of this unique book? TODAY is your chance – November 16, 2017, at 7pm (Semiahmoo Library, Surrey BC)

To register, call: 604-502-6459