Medicine Walk by Richard Wagamese

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A beautifully, sparely written novel about a young man and his estranged father, who find themselves on a final walk together. Franklin Starlight, an Ojibway teenager, knows next to nothing about his family, or his past. Along comes (returns) Eldon, his alcoholic absentee father, who takes Franklin on a last “medicine walk” to try and reconnect and finally share Frank’s history.

This was so beautiful. There are no saccharine, overtly emotional scenes. Richard Wagamese writes with careful expertise, and we share so much with these two characters without having too much unneccesary actual dialogue. Nature plays a great and important role, calming and vast, giving the Starlight men a world to disappear into.

This is a story about making mistakes, finding forgiveness, and moving on. There are no pleading excuses from Eldon, no righteous speeches from Frank. The themes of loyalty, family, love, and finding peace within yourself are all here, and explored beautifully. I look forward to reading more of Wagamese’s titles. (Submitted by Veronica)

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The Hero’s Walk by Anita Rau Badami

hero-walkAnita Rau Badami does an excellent job depicting the modern day life in India (I literally felt like a tourist submerged into the environment except there was also a good story and I didn’t have to physically travel anywhere). It focuses on one family, but a lot is tied into that one family’s journey: neighbours, traditions,  and daily routines.  Another interesting twist is the switching back and forth between Canada and India – this contrast is often very vivid (actually, just like everything in Badami’s book). You will feel the heat and smell the dust, or hear the rain gushing during the monsoon period. Fans of descriptive language will be thrilled with this novel. The drawback, to some people, it may seem longer than necessary at some parts of the book – but, tastes are just a matter of opinion.

One of the main characters in the novel is a 7 year-old girl, Nandana, who loses her parents in a car accident and has to go to India to live with her estranged grandparents. Nandana’s grandparents are internally suffocating from emotions of: grief, regret, uncertainty, failure, and frustration as they try their best to build a new life for their grandchild and fix up their own ones along the way. (Submitted by Mariya)

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Surrey: A City of Stories by K. Jane Watt

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Surrey:  A City of Stories is a Canada 150 legacy project produced by Heritage Services (City of Surrey).  Author, Jane Watt, recounts Surrey’s history from ancient times to the present, using photographs of artifacts, maps, historical photographs and documents.  Watt also includes transcriptions from oral histories. The extensive use of visuals to accompany text is very successful.  The past is brought to life vividly and clearly.  Most importantly, Watt demonstrates how Surrey residents of all backgrounds, collectively and individually, shaped our city in the past and in the present. (Submitted by Carolyn C.)

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Would you like to meet the author of this unique book? TODAY is your chance – November 16, 2017, at 7pm (Semiahmoo Library, Surrey BC)

To register, call: 604-502-6459

 

Just Think, I Could Have Been Normal: Growing up Extraordinary With Cerebral Palsy by Nova Bannatyne-Eng

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From the very first paragraphs, I was drawn into Nova’s biographical account. It was hard to put down the book. While reading Just Think, I Could Have Been Normal, I went through the entire spectrum of emotions: from tears to smiles, from anger to cheer, from sadness to hope. Nova Bannatyne was born with cerebral palsy, a diagnose that is pretty bad on its own, but the tormenting remarks and actions of many narrow-minded people that Nova encountered in her life – made it even worse. Yet, nothing could alter Nova’s soul or her determination to enjoy life and live it to the fullest. As a result, Nova’s journey, in my opinion, is more epic than any epic story I’ve ever read. If it wasn’t for Nova’s sense of humour and a warrior attitude that put a light twist on everything, the book could have been a torture to read, but it’s not. Instead, it leaves you feeling empowered, in awe, and wanting to be different – brave, accepting, and forgiving – just like Nova. (Submitted by Mariya)

Would you like to meet Nova Bannatyne, talk to her, and get an autograph? Surrey Libraries can help! On Wednesday, September 27th, 6:30pm-8:30pm, there will be an event happening at the Guildford Library called – Authors Among Us. Nova Bannatyne will be joining other local authors in our panel discussion. If you would like to attend this event, please, call 604-598-7360 to register. Event is free!

Secret Path by Gordon Downie

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The Secret Path, written by Gordon Downie (from Tragically Hip) and illustrated by Jeff Lemire, devastated me, just reflecting on the tragic story of 12 year old Chanie Wenjack makes me want to cry. This book so beautifully and powerfully tells the story of his life and untimely death in October of 1966. And yet, it is books or art or the intricate dance of both, that heal and make us grateful that we allow ourselves to be tender, to feel, to cry, and to be real. To regret what was done in the past and be inspired to insure that the future is a better place for our children. My heart aches as I wish, with all of my being that I could travel through time and space, to help Chanie home: to be with his loved ones and to share Batman #189 with him in the summer of 1967.

The residential schools were a dark chapter in history, just like the concentration camps were a dark chapter in history, I am grateful for books that remind us of what I pray we as a world population moving beyond the mistakes of our past will never let happen again and inspire me for what we all can bring about in the next 150 years with respect, love and tears. (Submitted by Inti)

 

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