Tag Archives: Canada

Just Think, I Could Have Been Normal: Growing up Extraordinary With Cerebral Palsy by Nova Bannatyne-Eng

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From the very first paragraphs, I was drawn into Nova’s biographical account. It was hard to put down the book. While reading Just Think, I Could Have Been Normal, I went through the entire spectrum of emotions: from tears to smiles, from anger to cheer, from sadness to hope. Nova Bannatyne was born with cerebral palsy, a diagnose that is pretty bad on its own, but the tormenting remarks and actions of many narrow-minded people that Nova encountered in her life – made it even worse. Yet, nothing could alter Nova’s soul or her determination to enjoy life and live it to the fullest. As a result, Nova’s journey, in my opinion, is more epic than any epic story I’ve ever read. If it wasn’t for Nova’s sense of humour and a warrior attitude that put a light twist on everything, the book could have been a torture to read, but it’s not. Instead, it leaves you feeling empowered, in awe, and wanting to be different – brave, accepting, and forgiving – just like Nova. (Submitted by Mariya)

Would you like to meet Nova Bannatyne, talk to her, and get an autograph? Surrey Libraries can help! On Wednesday, September 27th, 6:30pm-8:30pm, there will be an event happening at the Guildford Library called – Authors Among Us. Nova Bannatyne will be joining other local authors in our panel discussion. If you would like to attend this event, please, call 604-598-7360 to register. Event is free!

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Secret Path by Gordon Downie

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The Secret Path, written by Gordon Downie (from Tragically Hip) and illustrated by Jeff Lemire, devastated me, just reflecting on the tragic story of 12 year old Chanie Wenjack makes me want to cry. This book so beautifully and powerfully tells the story of his life and untimely death in October of 1966. And yet, it is books or art or the intricate dance of both, that heal and make us grateful that we allow ourselves to be tender, to feel, to cry, and to be real. To regret what was done in the past and be inspired to insure that the future is a better place for our children. My heart aches as I wish, with all of my being that I could travel through time and space, to help Chanie home: to be with his loved ones and to share Batman #189 with him in the summer of 1967.

The residential schools were a dark chapter in history, just like the concentration camps were a dark chapter in history, I am grateful for books that remind us of what I pray we as a world population moving beyond the mistakes of our past will never let happen again and inspire me for what we all can bring about in the next 150 years with respect, love and tears. (Submitted by Inti)

 

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