The Lost Art of Mixing by Erica Bauermeister

the lost art of mixing

A delightful read that combines culinary delights with the ups, downs, and twists of everyday human life. Several stories told from the young, old and in-between voices of various people from different walks of life in a small town in the USA.

All stories held together by the commonality of food and the enjoyment of food.  This is not a mystery, but a sweet little journey into a short glimpse of time in the lives of others. Maybe some life lessons to be learned who knows? A nice, quick read. (Submitted by Jamie).

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Tell Me More: Stories About the 12 Hardest Things I’m Learning to Say by Kelly Corrigan

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I can’t remember why I placed a hold on Tell Me More, but I’m happy that I did. On the dust jacket it cites the Huffington Post, who call her “the poet laureate of the ordinary.” This book evoked all sorts of responses from me; I laughed, I cried, I sent photos of passages to friends. It was the recounting of experiences in life that provide suggestions about how to handle heartbreaks and joys that a reader might encounter in their own life. I plan to re-visit it. (Submitted by J.Wilson)

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Framed! by James Ponti

framedDid you luv Nancy Drew or the Hardy Boys growing up? Are your kids obsessed with solving mysteries? Then James Ponti’s new junior sleuth series may be for you or for the chapter book reading children in your life. In “Framed” (2016), readers meet two young friends, Florian and Margaret, who are not only trying to navigate the perilous waters of middle school but also trying to help the FBI solve baffling, international crimes using ‘T.O.A.S.T’, their theory of all small things. These super smart seventh graders use T.O.A.S.T. to identify the small details that adults often overlook and to develop leads that will help them catch the criminal culprits. The first two books in this captivating series, “Framed” (2016) and “Vanished” (2017) are currently in our collection and we will acquire the third book “Trapped” (2018) in this ongoing series when it’s released in late September 2018. (Submitted by Andrea)

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The One-in-a-Million Boy by Monica Wood

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You think you are getting a light, ‘fast read’ kind of book when you first pick this one up, especially at the start, but once you get into it, the themes that emerge can be thought provoking. Loss is the main premise and the author gives it to us in many angles, of a child, a parent, a marriage. Even if you think this description sounds depressing, I feel Monica Wood has handled all of this with a gentle hand and humour. This book was recommended to me and I’m definitely going to recommend it to others. (Submitted by Renee)

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Beartown by Fredrik Backman

beartownIt’s been awhile since I’ve really loved a good book. Perhaps Rainbow Rowell’s Eleanor and Park was the last book that I finished and just wanted to hug. With Fredrik Backman’s Beartown, every page and every word, completely broke my heart into a million pieces.

Beartown is the name of a fictional small-town whose residents all pin their hopes and dreams on the local junior boys hockey team. We have Kevin, the team’s star player, who shoulders much of the pressure from his distant parents and all the citizens of Beartown. His best friend, Benji, is the boy with the sad eyes and a wild heart who tries to protect Kevin from anything that tries to break through their hockey bubble. Amat, whose mother Fatima works as a janitor at the ice rink, is the runty but speedy up and comer who has to battle being seen as a foreigner as well as deal with Bobo, the school bully. Then we have the coaches who constantly face the balancing act of taking care of their players and being forced to put the hockey club first. All of this buckles into a storm of emotions and events that eventually leads one teenager to raise a gun to the head of another and pull the trigger.

Beartown is filled with unforgettable characters that you will cry for, champion, be enraged at, and be inspired by. I could not put this book down, and I didn’t want it to end! A breathtaking fable of ambition, hope, and courage. (Submitted by Alan)

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God in Pink by Hasan Namir

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Hasan Namir’s novel, God in Pink, is a deeply powerful psychological and philosophical narrative. It’s a plea for justice, the use of critical thinking, and empathy.

Ramy is a young, gay man living and studying in Baghdad. His country, society, and religion view homosexuality as a sin; therefore, Ramy’s life is filled with loneliness, secrets, violence, injustice, and downright misery. After constantly living in fear and anxiety for many years, the protagonist of the story turns to God and his tumultuous heart and mind seek counsel from a local sheikh. However, help is not easy to find when people see the world in black and white colours only. Even more challenging is to make people think for themselves rather than follow scriptures which presumably state exactly what’s right and what’s wrong. One of Ramy’s greatest struggles is to understand why religion states that God loves us all equally, yet that same religion outlaws homosexuals, leaving them taunted and penalized for being the way they are.

This book offers plenty of thoughts for discussion and contemplation, and will serve as a perfect opportunity to touch base with your own values and beliefs. (Submitted by Surinder)

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Kings of the Wyld by Nicholas Eames

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I had just about given up on heroic fantasy. Then, I discovered Kings of the Wyld, a fresh and lively standalone adventure that is gripping, funny, and occasionally brutal. The plot is familiar. Circumstances force a former mercenary band of heroes to reform for one last quest. But the mixture of classic high fantasy tropes from Tolkien, the grittiness of Joe Abercrombie (without the pessimism), and the light satirical touch and humour of Terry Pratchett, give this story an engaging vigour.

In the end, it’s a very human story with sympathetic, likeable characters, especially the main protagonist Clay Cooper. He is an affable man who would like to put his violent past behind him and enjoy a peaceful life with his family. But of course, fate is not done with him yet. He must rise to the occasion one more time, and persuade his erstwhile companions to join him. Along the way they face every sort of magical and monstrous creature in the fantastic bestiary, and face some mighty foes in battle. They must rediscover the power of friendship and family, and what it means to be a hero.

 Recommended for lovers of heroic fantasy or anyone who likes a rousing adventure and doesn’t mind a certain amount of graphic violence. (Submitted by Jim)

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