Lost Connections by Johann Hari

Image result for lost connectionsThis non-fiction book discusses such a prominent topic of depression.  I love that the author is not actually a doctor or psychologist, but an investigative reporter who researches studies on depression and travels the world to interview all the “who’s who” in this realm.  It’s written in a “journalistic” style with many anecdotal stories and personal accounts which makes it short-story like, while keeping facts, research, and breakthroughs in science as a top priority and maintains validity on every point.  Personally, I feel that Hari (the author) is spot on about his reasons why today’s world has such a high rate of depression.  And while this is a fantastic read if you have depression, it’s just as an important read if you don’t!  I feel the main component – Connections – is useful for personal growth, medical science, but also in business.  A focus on re-connecting in every aspect of our lives could be the positive change in our humanity and businesses that can incorporate this philosophy into their plan and vision, will ultimately keep customers happy, coming back, and CONNECTED! (Submitted by Marnie)

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God in Pink by Hasan Namir

god in pink

Hasan Namir’s novel, God in Pink, is a deeply powerful psychological and philosophical narrative. It’s a plea for justice, the use of critical thinking, and empathy.

Ramy is a young, gay man living and studying in Baghdad. His country, society, and religion view homosexuality as a sin; therefore, Ramy’s life is filled with loneliness, secrets, violence, injustice, and downright misery. After constantly living in fear and anxiety for many years, the protagonist of the story turns to God and his tumultuous heart and mind seek counsel from a local sheikh. However, help is not easy to find when people see the world in black and white colours only. Even more challenging is to make people think for themselves rather than follow scriptures which presumably state exactly what’s right and what’s wrong. One of Ramy’s greatest struggles is to understand why religion states that God loves us all equally, yet that same religion outlaws homosexuals, leaving them taunted and penalized for being the way they are.

This book offers plenty of thoughts for discussion and contemplation, and will serve as a perfect opportunity to touch base with your own values and beliefs. (Submitted by Surinder)

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 print and e-book formats available now!